Club Feature: How TAMID is Planning For the Fall Semester

Many NYU Shanghai club presidents have concerns for this coming semester. In-person meetings will not be feasible, club engagement last semester was low, planning ahead is extremely difficult, there will be obstacles to connecting with freshmen, and ensuring balanced group dynamics between Chinese and international students will presumably pose challenges.

Regarding freshman involvement, TAMID plans to prioritize showing them the club’s commitment to the best experience, despite the unusual circumstances. A plan that TAMID has, as explained by Jarrod, is to hold “two Q&A sessions on CountMeIn. [TAMID’s] goal in these sessions is to help answer any questions freshman might have asked in person, and start to build relationships with new students.”

TAMID, a well-known and popular business club at NYU Shanghai, has started planning for the fall semester and their Executive board provided OCA with insights regarding their own transition to being a remotely-operated club. 

The incoming club co-presidents, Jarrod Horan (‘23) and Sally Park (‘23), have been working diligently since the end of spring semester to modify TAMID’s normal curriculum to make it Zoom-friendly while still being engaging and interesting. 

Ryan Chin, the Director of Education, spoke to some of the changes implemented and his role. Typically, he is in charge of “curating education sessions for [the] Consulting and Investment Fund” groups, and the club has “decided to move all […] education sessions online so that everyone in TAMID, whether they are physically in Shanghai or not, can all join our weekly club meetings.” 

When asked what he thought made planning for next semester most successful, Jarrod said that their dedicated Executive board was to thank. He emphasized the commitment level of each E-board member and specified that their own enthusiasm was key. 

Nevertheless, the E-board has inevitably faced several difficulties, including, according to club treasurer Tami Te, coordinating “time difference[s], especially when having bi-weekly board meetings.” Tami highlights an inevitable challenge that all clubs will have to face when planning meetings, activities and events. 

Regarding freshman involvement, TAMID plans to prioritize showing them the club’s commitment to the best experience, despite the unusual circumstances. A plan that TAMID has, as explained by Jarrod, is to hold “two Q&A sessions on CountMeIn. [TAMID’s] goal in these sessions is to help answer any questions freshman might have asked in person, and start to build relationships with new students.” 

Ninad Mukherjee, Director of Consulting, and Sally spoke to their goal of ensuring connection between the Chinese and international communities. “TAMID by nature involves a lot of collaboration between its members– our job is to make sure we have a strong ratio of Chinese to international students and have them work together on projects [despite distance-learning],” says Ninad. 

Sally continued to explain that TAMID “plan[s] to make a greater effort in [their] marketing and campaigning for the club because TAMID truly would benefit both the Chinese and international communities.” Sally maintains that it is TAMID’s role to show “students the value that TAMID can bring them.”

TAMID’s preliminary efforts demonstrate how one club is adapting to remote-learning next semester, and the E-board provided OCA with a glimpse into how they are doing so. All clubs and student-run organizations will likely face difficulties this coming semester, but TAMID provides hope that clubs may have a larger, more organized presence this semester relative to last.  

This article was written by Steph Scaglia currently based in San Francisco, California. Please reach out the author through instagram account @stephanie.scaglia.
Photo credit: Quizlet / No artist named

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